Early Detection Research Network

Generalized breast density metrics.

Mammograms represent data that can inform future risk of breast cancer. Data from two case-control study populations were analyzed. Population 1 included women (N  =  180 age matched case-control pairs) with mammograms acquired with one indirect x-ray conversion mammography unit. Population 2 included women (N  =  319 age matched case-control pairs) with mammograms acquired from 6 direct x-ray conversion units. The Fourier domain was decomposed into n concentric rings (radial spatial frequency bands). The power in each ring was summarized giving a set of measures. We investigated images in raw, for presentation (processed) and calibrated representations and made comparison with the percentage of breast density (BD) determined with the operator assisted Cumulus method. Breast cancer associations were evaluated with conditional logistic regression, adjusted for body mass index and ethnicity. Odds ratios (ORs), per standard deviation increase derived from the respective breast density distributions and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated. A measure from a lower radial frequency ring, corresponding 0.083-0.166 cycles mm<sup>-1</sup> and BD had significant associations with risk in both populations. In Population 1, the Fourier measure produced significant associations in each representation: OR  =  1.76 (1.33, 2.32) for raw; OR  =  1.43 (1.09, 1.87) for processed; and OR  =  1.68 (1.26, 2.25) for calibrated. BD also provided significant associations in Population 1: OR  =  1.72 (1.27, 2.33). In Population 2, the Fourier measure produced significant associations for each representation as well: OR  =  1.47 (1.19, 1.80) for raw; OR  =  1.38 (1.15, 1.67) for processed; and OR  =  1.42 (1.15, 1.75) for calibrated. BD provided significant associations in Population 2: OR  =  1.43 (1.17, 1.76). Other coincident spectral regions were also predictive of case-control status. In sum, generalized breast density measures were significantly associated with breast cancer in both FFDM technologies.

Drukteinis J, Fowler EEE, Heine J, Miltich C, Sellers TA, Smallwood A

30523909

Phys Med Biol, 2018, 64 (1)

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