Navigation

Personal tools

Because of a lapse in government funding, the information on this website may not be up to date, transactions submitted via the website may not be processed, and the agency may not be able to respond to inquiries until appropriations are enacted.

The NIH Clinical Center (the research hospital of NIH) is open. For more details about its operating status, please visit https://cc.nih.gov/.

Updates regarding government operating status and resumption of normal operations can be found at https://USA.gov/.

You are here: Home / Publications / Prognostic significance of occult tumor cells in the apheresis products of patients with advanced breast cancer receiving high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell support.

Prognostic significance of occult tumor cells in the apheresis products of patients with advanced breast cancer receiving high-dose chemotherapy and autologous hematopoietic progenitor cell support.

15148495

Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.. 2004 Jun 10 (6).

We prospectively evaluated the prognostic significance of occult tumor cells (OTCs) contaminating the peripheral blood progenitor cell apheresis products of patients with advanced breast cancer receiving high-dose chemotherapy. Immunocytochemistry of peripheral blood progenitor cells was performed in 242 patients with high-risk primary breast cancer (HRPBC) and in 111 patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). OTCs were detected in 6.6% of HRPBC patients and in 16.2% of MBC patients (P = .005). In HRPBC, OTCs correlated with worse prognostic scores and larger tumor sizes, but not with axillary nodal status, hormone receptors, or HER2. In the MBC group, OTCs correlated with bone marrow involvement and with disease status at transplantation. The number of apheresis procedures was not associated with the risk of contamination. In HRPBC patients, at a median follow-up of 7 years (range, 1.5-11 years), the presence of OTCs correlated with worse event-free survival (P = .007) and overall survival (P = .002). In the MBC group, OTCs correlated with worse event-free survival (P = .04), but not overall survival (P = .2). In multivariate analyses, the presence of OTCs had an independent adverse effect on outcome in HRPBC, but not MBC. Our observations imply a direct role of OTCs in posttransplantation relapse in HRPBC.