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Dubinett - Targeted Sequencing 2012

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No coordinating investigator defined.

No involved investigator sites defined.

UNKNOWN
Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancers Research Group

we propose to use targeted massively parallel DNA sequencing to identify somatic alterations within mutational hotspots in matched sets of primary lung tumors, premalignant lesions, and adjacent,histologically normal lung tissue.

1. Use targeted massively parallel DNA sequencing to assess the presence of mutations in specific genomic regions in matched sets of primary lung adenocarcinomas, premalignant lesions, and adjacent, histologically normal lung tissues obtained from the same patient. What is the prevalence of common lung-cancer-associated mutations in a panel of adenocarcinomas or premalignant lesions from the same patient? What is their baseline prevalence in lung tissue with no histologic indication of disease? 2. To identify mutations whose prevalence is significantly higher in tumors and premalignant lesions than in histologically normal lung tissue from the same patient, assess the variability of this prevalence among independent specimens within each patient, and examine the biological relationship between mutations whose prevalence is covariant across patients. Which mutations may be useful as early markers of lung cancer in patients with subclinical disease and which may be clinically actionable? How much does the spectrum of known cancer-associated mutations vary between independent premalignant lesions or different samples of the same primary tumor? Are there mutations that are frequently associated with each other or mutually exclusive, and if so, does this covariance reflect the biological relationship of the genes in which they occur?

There are currently no biomarkers annotated for this protocol.

No datasets are currently associated with this protocol.


New Funding Opportunity: Biomarker Development Laboratories for the Early Detection Network: Applications Due May 23

Update: Pre-application webinar information now available.

The National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Prevention has released a new funding opportunity to solicit organ-specific applications for Biomarker Developmental Laboratories (BDLs), one of the four scientific units of the recently funded Early Detection Research Network (EDRN). The EDRN is a national infrastructure funded to discover, develop, and validate biomarkers for risk assessment, detection, and molecular diagnosis and prognosis of early cancer. BDLs are responsible for the discovery, development, characterization, and testing of new, or the refinement of existing, biomarkers and biomarker assays for risk assessment, detection, and molecular diagnosis and prognosis of cancers.

The existing BDLs are primarily focused on ovary and gastrointestinal cancers. The proposed BDLs (to be supported under this funding opportunity) should be focused on one or more of the following cancers: breast, prostate and other genitourinary organs, or lung. In addition, cancers with rapidly rising incidence rates, e.g., endometrial, hepatocellular, kidney, thyroid, oropharyngeal cancers, and/or cancers with unique etiology, e.g., mesothelioma, will be considered.

The newly funded units of the Early Detection Research Network will be announced later in April. Successful applicants have already been notified. Those researchers who were not successful during the last round of applications are encouraged to apply to this opportunity.