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TF

Basics

Aliases:
This biomarker is also known as:
  • transferrin,
  • TRF,
  • PRO1557,
  • PRO2086,

View in BioMuta

Description…

TF, or transferrin, a glycoprotein with an approximate molecular weight of 76.5 kDa, is thought to have been created as a result of an ancient gene duplication event that led to generation of homologous C and N-terminal domains each of which binds one ion of ferric iron. The function of this protein is to transport iron from the intestine, reticuloendothelial system, and liver parenchymal cells to all proliferating cells in the body. This protein may also have a physiologic role as granulocyte/pollen-binding protein (GPBP) involved in the removal of certain organic matter and allergens from serum.

Attributes

QA State: Curated
Type: Protein
Short Name:
HGNC Name: TF

Datasets

There are no datasets associated with this biomarker.

Organs

The following organs have data associated with this biomarker…

Ovary

Attributes

Phase: Three
QA State: Curated

Overview

In laboratory testing, transferrin, in a panel (including apolipoprotein A-1, transthyretin, and CA125) has been shown to be a highly sensitive (96%) predictor of early stage ovarian cancer and endometrial cancer.

Performance Comment

Of the 28 ovarian cancer biomarkers tested in prediagnostic specimens, from the PLCO, CA125 remains the single best biomarker for ovarian cancer and has its strongest signal within six months of diagnosis. TF alone was not a strong predictor.

Prostate

Attributes

Phase: One
QA State: Under Review

Overview

No additional prostate data available.

Performance Comment

19 common probe sets (15 unique genes) were used to develop a PAM-based classifier, which had an average accuracy of 87% when it was tested on 47 independent tumor-adjacent stroma samples. The 15 genes represented in the classifier are: GADD45B, CDKN1A, NLRP1, ERBB3, FMO5, KIAA0746///SERINC2, AMFR, DPP4, PGC, YWHAE, EHF, TF, TNFSF10, EIF5A, TGM4. This is the first general tumor microenvironment-based prognostic classifier. Tumor-adjacent prostate cancer stroma contains numerous changes in gene expression at the time of diagnosis that correlate with the chance of relapse following prostatectomy. These results indicate that the prostate cancer microenvironment exhibits reproducible changes useful for predicting outcomes for patients.

Studies

This biomarker is currently being annotated or is under review. You must be logged in or do not have permission to view any additional information. Contact Heather Kincaid at heather.kincaid@jpl.nasa.gov if you should have access to this biomarker.

New Funding Opportunity: Biomarker Development Laboratories for the Early Detection Network: Applications Due May 23

Update: Pre-application webinar information now available.

The National Cancer Institute's Division of Cancer Prevention has released a new funding opportunity to solicit organ-specific applications for Biomarker Developmental Laboratories (BDLs), one of the four scientific units of the recently funded Early Detection Research Network (EDRN). The EDRN is a national infrastructure funded to discover, develop, and validate biomarkers for risk assessment, detection, and molecular diagnosis and prognosis of early cancer. BDLs are responsible for the discovery, development, characterization, and testing of new, or the refinement of existing, biomarkers and biomarker assays for risk assessment, detection, and molecular diagnosis and prognosis of cancers.

The existing BDLs are primarily focused on ovary and gastrointestinal cancers. The proposed BDLs (to be supported under this funding opportunity) should be focused on one or more of the following cancers: breast, prostate and other genitourinary organs, or lung. In addition, cancers with rapidly rising incidence rates, e.g., endometrial, hepatocellular, kidney, thyroid, oropharyngeal cancers, and/or cancers with unique etiology, e.g., mesothelioma, will be considered.

The newly funded units of the Early Detection Research Network will be announced later in April. Successful applicants have already been notified. Those researchers who were not successful during the last round of applications are encouraged to apply to this opportunity.